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JiuJitsu - BJJ Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (Jiu-Jitsu) Martial Arts Style

Brazilian jiu jitsu (JiuJitsu)

also named BJJ (BJJ; Portuguese: jiu-jitsu brasileiro) is a martial art and combat sport system that focuses on grappling with particular emphasis on ground fighting. BJJ was developed from Kodokan judo ground fighting (newaza) fundamentals that were taught by a number of Japanese individuals including Takeo Yano, Mitsuyo Maeda, Soshihiro Satake, and Isao Okano. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu eventually came to be its own defined combat sport through the innovations, practices, and adaptation of judo.

BJJ martial arts is founded on the concept that a smaller, weaker person can successfully defend themselves against a bigger, stronger, heavier opponent by using technique, leverage, and most notably, taking the fight to the ground, and then applying joint locks and chokeholds to defeat the opponent. BJJ training can be used for sport grappling tournaments and in self-defense situations. Sparring (commonly referred to as "rolling" within the BJJ community) and live drilling play a major role in training and the practitioner's development. BJJ is considered a martial art, a sport, a method for promoting physical fitness and building character, and a way of life.

Brazilian JiuJitsu martial arts history


Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu
. The name "JiuJitsu" derives from an older romanization of its original spelling in the West (is still in common use); the modern Hepburn romanization of 柔術 is "jūjutsu".

When Maeda left Japan, judo was still often referred to as "Kano jiu-jitsu", or, even more generically, simply as Jiu-Jitsu. Higashi, the co-author of Kano Jiu-Jitsu[19] wrote in the foreword:

Some confusion has arisen over the employment of the term 'jiudo'. To make the matter clear I will state that jiudo is the term selected by Professor Kano as describing his system more accurately than jiu-jitsu does. Professor Kano is one of the leading educators of Japan, and it is natural that he should cast about for the technical word that would most accurately describe his system. But the Japanese people generally still cling to the more popular nomenclature and call it jiu-jitsu.[19]

Outside Japan, however, this distinction was noted even less. Thus, when Maeda and Satake arrived in Brazil in 1914, every newspaper announced their art as being "Jiu-Jitsu", despite both men being Kodokan judoka

A Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu martial arts